Merriam's Guide to Naming Second Edition Now Available

9780982082935_CoverImageI am pleased to announce the second edition of my book Merriam’s Guide to Naming is now available. In the half dozen years since the first edition, I’ve led over a hundred company and product naming projects for Fortune 500 multinationals, mid-size companies and start-ups. As part of this work, I’ve helped executives wrestle with questions and deal with challenges that were not adequately covered in the first edition. And, in reviewing dozens of magazine articles I’ve written and media interviews I’ve given, I realized I had a large body of new knowledge on the subject of naming. Merriam’s Guide to Naming was quite overdue for a redo. Click here to order.

Branding Scandals: Gruber-Gate and Scandal Naming Since Watergate

scandals with gate in the nameWatergate tops most top ten US scandal lists, which may explain the ubiquity of the ___-gate naming meme for scandals.  Gruber-gate is only the latest in a long list of scandals with “gate” in the name.

The naming -gate scandal construct got it’s start shortly after Watergate and Nixon’s impeachment with BillyGate, where President Carter’s beer swilling brother accepted payment from Libya to become their foreign agent. Since then, -gate naming has been in full swing beyond politics into fields as diverse as science with ClimateGate (shout out to Buffalo with historic snowfall levels today), media with news reporting truth problems in RatherGate, sports with the shenanigans of a certain golf player in TigerGate, and entertainment with the wardrobe malfunction known as NippleGate.

The field of politics remains at the top of the flood of gate names, with Bill Clinton, being the top inspiration from TrooperGate to TravelGate to MonicaGate and more. The British are first through the gate, however, with the  scandal involving a Member of Parliament insulting a policeman who stopped him from using the wrong gate at 10 Downing Street. While rating rather low on the disgrace meter, GateGate wins by having the best -gate scandal name.

 

 

Converse Lawsuit to Protect Iconic Sneaker Brand

Adweek reports today that Converse has sued 31 companies in U.S. District Court for infringing on its Chuck Taylor All Star brand design. Brands are not just about names and logos–they also encompass shapes.

trademark-brand-shapes-converse-tiffany-cocacola-chanel-beetle

Coca-Cola was a pioneer in recognizing brand design as a key asset to protect. The company’s contour bottle is one of the first three-dimensional shapes to be trademarked in 1915. In its 2014 fiscal year, Nike reported that Converse generated about $1.7 billion in sales–the iconic shape is definitely an asset to fight to protect.

Successful brands frequently spawn copycats and counterfeiters. Brands like Chanel spend millions stamping out such parasites who try to leech a living off its iconic image. With $1.7 billion in sales in fiscal 2014, Converse has a lot at stake.

Content Marketing and Cheap Writers: Don't Cut Corners on Your Brand

Creating branded content is an increasingly important part of brand building. The demand for more and more content makes it tempting to hire cheap writers.  How hard can it be to write a tweet? Does the daily blog really need Mark Twain quality? ABSOLUTELY:

I offer some insight in this well-written article by Debra Donston-Miller
“Why Underpaying Writers Can Kill Your Content Marketing”

contently-merriam-content-marketing-writing-brand

Adrian Peterson and Vikings Brand: Guilty Until Proven Innocent

Brand sponsorship requires a rush to judgement. Though Adrian Peterson has not been found guilty of a crime, brands can’t afford to serve as a backdrop to the drama of indictments and investigations. Radisson’s brand did literally serve as a backdrop to yesterday’s press conference by Vikings general manger Rick Spielman as he discussed child abuse allegations involving the team’s brightest star. This morning, Radisson announced it was pulling its sponsorship.

adisson-viking-sponsorship-adrian-peterson-indictmentBrand reputation is too valuable to risk in the innocent until proven guilty dynamic of the court system. While I sincerely hope Mr. Peterson is cleared of charges and is indeed innocent, the brand damage is already done.

 

More on celebrity brands:

NBC interview discussing Seattle Seahawk’s Richard Sherman

Lance Armstrong and the Livestrong brand

The phenomenon of “Tebowing”

Michael Vick’s comeback

Martha Stewart and Tiger Woods–lessons for celebrity brands

And even more here

 

 

Burger King Brand Damage--Does Being "Foreign" Hurt?

Burger-King-taxes-CanadaThe “King” has a new country. Burger King becoming a Canadian brand has some people up in arms, screeching about lack of patriotism and even calling for a boycott. (Oddly, the same people complaining about Burger King benefiting from “tax inversion” and questioning its patriotism are totally fine with Google’s elaborate Double Irish, Dutch Sandwich, Cayman Island tax avoidance schemes and the fact that GE parks $108 billion overseas to bring its tax rate to just over 7%.)

History has shown that foreign brands do quite well in the U.S. 47% of the top 100 brands in the U.S. are foreign–many of them dominating their categories. And most American consumers have no idea what “nationality” their brands might be. Few American’s can name the nationality of brands like Shell, Haier, or Adidas. Frankly, for many brands, determining nationality is almost impossible. Volkswagen has a reputation for being a German brand, but many designs come from India, with parts from China, tooling in Pennsylvania and assembly in Mexico.

No worries, eh. Burger King can enjoy a reasonable tax rate and not take a brand hit for becoming Canadian. More excellent commentary on taxes, Canada and the Burger King brand here.

Too Much Spoils the Brand: Google Over-Doodles the World Cup

bbc-news-interview-lisa-merriamGoogle Doodles have become part of the Google brand. BBC News Magazine interviewed me about how whimsically changing the Google logo defied standard “brand police” rules about brand consistency.

During the World Cup, it seemed Google had a new Doodle every day. While some change works for Google, too much defeats the purpose. A new Google Doodle no longer surprises Google users and thus no longer gains the attention it once did. It’s like saying “boo!” to a child one time too many. Pretty soon you get no reaction and if you keep doing it, you actually become annoying. Google Doodles are a great, fun aspect to the Google brand–if done in moderation. Over-Doodling the Google brand turns it into an uninteresting scribble.google-over-doodle-world-cup

Congratulations to BattleFrog Obstacle Race Series by Navy SEALS

Working with start-ups is a special joy. Client BattleFrog Obstacle Race Series held their inaugural event May 31 – June 1 at the Atlanta International Horse Park. It was run with the precision and integrity you would expect from Navy SEALs who started the BattleFrog and who designed and built the course.

Hobie Call, on of the top US obstacle course athletes, raced to his win

Hobie Call, one of the top US obstacle course athletes, raced to his win

Navy SEALs were on hand to coach racers through obstacles, motivating athletes of all ages to do their best

Navy SEALs were on hand to coach racers through obstacles, motivating athletes of all ages to do their best

Navy SEALs know that real winners are the ones that never make excuses and never quit

Navy SEALs know that real winners are the ones with heart: They take on every obstacle, never make excuses and never quit

Live capability demos from actual Navy SEALs were part of the day long event

Live capability demos from actual Navy SEALs were part of the day-long BattleFrog event

The BattleFrog is the newest and most unique race series in the sport of obstacle racing. SEALs don’t need electro-shock, fire or other gimmicks to challenge you. Their training, so notoriously arduous that 80% who try fail, is done on the tourist-filled beaches of southern California. The BattleFrog series is just as challenging.

At the same time, the SEAL ethos of teamwork infuses every step of the course, with real SEALs on hand to coach, cheer and motivate racers. Courses are designed for every age and ability. Taking care of each other is core to the Naval Special Warfare community. BattleFrog obstacles each honor individual fallen SEALs. Proceeds from the event support the Navy SEAL Foundation, Navy SEAL Museum and Memorial and the Trident House, organizations BattleFrog has selected  for its mission to honor memory, preserve legacy, support families.

Next races:

Carolinas June 21-22

DC/Baltimore July 19-20

New York/NJ/Philly August 2-3

Pittsburgh October 4-5

 

Recalls Toyota Brand vs GM Brand: GM Smashes Its U.S. Recall Record and the Idea of a "New GM"

gm-brand-damage-recalls-switchgateYesterday, GM announced yet more recalls that brought the total number of vehicle call-backs to an all-time record. The damage to an already hurting brand–see “Switchgate”–is incalculable. The idea of a “new GM” is taking a beating.

Toyota suffered similar negative press several years ago, but the strength of its brand, built over decades, helped it through. GM does not have that asset so this latest disaster may well sink it.

More on Automotive Branding:

Volt vs. Edsel
Volt Green Brand Bomb
GM: General Motors Reorganized Brand Architecture
Toyota Brand During the Recalls
Toyota Recall Doublespeak
Toyota Brand Bounces Back after Recalls
Brand Experience: Land Rover Dealers Take Owners Off Road

 

 

Bush or Clinton--Which Tarnished Old Brand Will Win?

Jonah Goldberg has an excellent analysis of political brands in “Jeb, Hillary and the curse of tarnished political brands” published in the Los Angeles Times.

ClintonDonkey JebBushElephant

It will be interesting to see which old brand from decades past people will choose–or if they will opt for one that is totally new.

 

 

 

 

Sports Hangover: Talking Richard Sherman's Brand on NCB Sports

NBC SportsI was interviewed by NBC Sports about Richard Sherman’s brand value post tirade. Did Sherman destroy his brand with his boorish rant or did he turn golden? Opinion is evenly split between those who decry his poor sportsmanship and those who think his antics brought him the notoriety necessary to attract sponsorship dollars.

Sherman’s salary is about $550,000 before taxes and agents. Crabtree–the 49er receiver who didn’t catch the ball and didn’t get the touchdown–earns $2.7 million in salary and even more in sponsorships. Sherman really has nowhere to go but up. One commentator pegged his brand worth at $5 million in the days after that winning play and tirade.

I’m inclined to agree Sherman’s brand worth has gone up. He is an engaging guy who wins games. He was a poor sport Sunday, but he can tweak his brand and start pulling down the big bucks. I recommend he do something self deprecating. Right now, he is rude and outspoken. With care, he can downplay the rude and dial up the outspoken part. Many brands would like up for that. If he can’t manage that finesse, he can always be the spokesperson for Massengill Douche.